WELCOME

We hope that you find these pages informative and illuminating; they are designed to give you an insight into our lodge in particular and of course Freemasonry in general.   We sincerely hope you enjoy your visit to our web pages and for those of you who are masons we look forward to seeing you at one of our meetings, but if you are new to Masonry and considering joining then you need look no further, you will be assured of a warm and friendly welcome in the Liversage Lodge. We meet at 6.15pm on the 3rd Monday in the month throughout the year at the The Grange, 457 Burton Road, Littleover, Derby for our regular Lodge, but on the 2nd Tuesday of each month, except June, July and August, we have our Lodge of Instruction which is a much less formal gathering. This is where we practice ritual, rehearse for future events and where the Master and Officers for the following year get a real feel for the job. There are 250,000 Freemasons belonging to 8,000 Lodges throughout England and Wales.  Worldwide, the figure rises to six million, all with their own special reasons why they enjoy Freemasonry. For  some, it’s about making new friends  and acquaintances. For others, it’s  being able to help deserving causes - making a contribution to family and society. But for most, it is simply an enjoyable hobby. A chance to meet old friends in a happy and sociable environment. Every man has his own reason for joining Freemasonry and hopefully you’ll find your reason in the Liversage Lodge. If you think Freemasonry might be for you then contact us here. Click here to email THE LODGE SECRETARY The Secretary Liversage Lodge The Grange 457 Burton Road Littleover DE23 6XX Tel: 01283 703282 or 07570 465493

ABOUT

NAVIGATION
SOCIAL
Copyright Lodge of St. Andrew 2015/16
1

THE LODGE ROOM

Masonic   Lodges   are   named   by   their   original   founding   members. They   can   be   named   after   the   town   they're   in,   a   historical   figure,   a famous   Mason,   or   even   a   symbolic   word   or   phrase.   The   name   of the    lodge    is    always    followed    by    a    number,    in    our    case    the Liversage   Lodge   No.5027.   The   number   is   issued   by   Grand   Lodge   of England    and    designates    the    order    in    which    lodges    have    been chartered. The older the lodge, the smaller the number. Many   of   the   details   in   a   lodge   room   are   patterned   after   aspects   of King    Solomon's    Temple,    as    described    in    the    Bible    and    other historical   records.   Freemasonry   teaches   by   symbolism,   and   much of    that    symbolism    is    based    upon    the    accounts    of    Solomon's Temple.   The   Temple   was   built   in   the   10th   century   B.C.   on   Mount Moriah   in   Jerusalem.   Solomon   built   it   as   a   temple   to   God   and   to store   the   sacred   Ark   of   the   Covenant,   which   contained   the   tablets of   the   Ten   Commandments   given   by   God   to   Moses.   The   details   of Solomon's    Temple    are    described    in    the    Bible    in    1    Kings    and    2 Chronicles.   In   its   time,   the   temple's   magnificence   was   known   all over the ancient world. When   Freemasonry   became   a   philosophical   organization   in   the 1700s,   the   Masons   who   developed   the   ceremonies   and   practices of   the   fraternity   adopted   the   symbolism   of   Solomon's   Temple   to help teach moral, social and spiritual ideals. Until   recently,   it   was   common   practice   for   a   lodge   building   to   be called      a      Masonic      temple,      but      because      of      a      general misunderstanding   that   Freemasons   actually   went   their   lodges   to "worship",   it   was   decided   to   remove   the   word   temple   and   replace it   with   Lodge   Room.   You   will   still   find   the   word   Temple   being   used within the Lodge but this is out of familiarity and habit. A   lodge   room   contains   much   that   is   based   on   the   descriptions   of Solomon's   Temple,   however   there   are   many   variations   throughout the   world,   depending   on   differences   in   customs,   rituals,   and   rules, but in general, lodge rooms are arranged in a very similar fashion. The    modern    Masonic    Lodge    Room    is    rectangular    with    seating around   the   perimeter .   The   ceremonies   of   the   lodge   take   place   in the centre of the room, so everybody has a good view. Lodge   Rooms   are   oriented   east   to   west.    Ancient   temples   were constructed   this   way   to   be   aligned   with   the   east-to-west   path   of the   sun.   Even   if   a   Masonic   building   actually   faces   north   and   south, when   you   walk   into   the   lodge   room,   you   are   symbolically   facing the East. There   is   an   altar   or   pedestal   where   the   Holy   Book   is   placed.   This book   is   referred   to   as   the   Volume   of   Sacred   Law.   In   some   Lodges the   altar   is   in   the   centre   of   the   room   in   some   the   altar   is   directly   in front of the Master's chair. Officers   have   chairs   located   at   specific   positions   in   the   room.   The Master   is   in   the   east,   on   a   raised   platform   of   three   steps.   The Senior   Warden   is   in   the   west   on   a   platform   of   two   steps,   and   the Junior   Warden   is   in   the   south   on   one   step.   The   steps   symbolise the progression of life: youth, manhood, and age. There   are   two   tall   pillars   with   globes   on   the   top,   patterned   after two   bronze   columns   that   were   prominent   architectural   features of    Solomon's    Temple.    The    pillars    can    sometimes    be    found    on either   side   of   the   Senior   Warden,   or   sometimes   next   to   a   doorway leading into the lodge. The   Liversage   Lodge   meets   on   the   third   Wednesday   of   the   month throughout   the   year,   where   communications   are   read,   proposed members    are    voted    on,    and    the    members    catch    up    on    each other's   lives.   Often,   guest   speakers   are   invited,   or   a   member   will give   a   presentation   on   the   ritual,   history,   philosophy,   or   symbols of    Masonry.    Other    special    meetings    are    held    to    initiate    new members   and   perform   the   various   ceremonies   to   advance   them to full membership. These ceremonies are called degrees. Because   the   primary   goal   of   Freemasonry   is   fellowship,   a   meal   is served   after   the   meeting,   in   the   lodge   dining   room   in   the   old English    Festive    Board    tradition    of    a    banquet    where    traditional Masonic songs are sung and ceremonial toasting takes place.

FREEMASONRY

Freemasonry     is     one     of     the     world's     oldest     secular     fraternal societies,   having   been   in   existence   since   the   17th   century.   There are   lodges   of   freemasons   in   every   part   of   the   world.   It   has   its origins    and    symbolically    bases    itself    on    the    old    craft    guilds    of stonemasons   who   built   our   cathedrals   and   many   other   wonderful buildings.   Our   members   are   drawn   from   every   walk   of   life   and from    every    race,    colour    and    creed,    and    all    are    welcome.    The fraternity    is    non-denominational    non    political,    these    subjects being     specifically     excluded     from     our     discussions.     However, essential   qualifications   for   membership   are   a   belief   in   a   Supreme Being,   God,   or   however   you   wish   to   describe   the   Deity.   Have   a desire   to   attain   and   maintain   the   highest   standards   of   morality and be charitably inclined. WHAT     WE     ACHIEVE:     The     three     grand     principles     on     which Freemasonry   is   founded   are   Brotherly   Love,   Relief,   and   Truth   and every   freemason   endeavours   to   achieve   these   high   ideals.   These principals   are   the   basis   for   all   our   ceremonies   and   quoting   from   a Masonic   article   "that   enshrined   in   our   constitutions   and   has   been since   1723,   freemasons   were   enjoined   to   be   men   of   honour   and honesty,   by   whatever   Denominations   or   persuasions   they   may   be distinguished,   whereby   freemasonry   becomes   the   centre   of   Union and   the   means   of   conciliating   true   friendship   among   persons   that must   have   ever   remained   at   a   perpetual   distance."   To   experience the   atmosphere   of   a   Masonic   lodge   where   the   members   truly   sit as   brothers,   in   friendship   and   harmony   is   quite   unique   in   to-day's society. Our    ceremonies,    which    are    carried    out    in    ancient    form,    with stonemason's   customs   and   tools   being   used   as   allegorical   guides, demonstrate   and   emphasise   the   high   ideals   of   our   society.   These ceremonies   are   best   described   by   quoting   from   a   Masonic   article which   states   that   "   by   enacting   a   series   of   memorised   playlets   we teach   others   and   ourselves   tolerance   and   an   understanding   of humankind,    the    importance    of    charity    and    we    learn    about ourselves    with    a    view    to    becoming    better    and    more    tolerant human beings". Charity    (Relief)    plays    a    major    role    in    Masonic    thinking.    The charitable    support    given    by    Freemasons,    both    with    personal involvement   and   money   is   well   known.   At   national   level   many Charities   and   appeals   are   helped   by   the   Grand   Charities,   to   which we   all   contribute.   At   Provincial   and   local   levels   individual   lodges give   their   support   to   the   good   works   being   done   in   their   particular areas.   To   freemasons   to   relieve   the   needs   of   those   less   fortunate than    ourselves    is    always    in    our    minds.    Truth    can    cover    many facets   of   life,   but   to   a   freemason   it   is   mainly   the   knowledge   of himself,   his   integrity,   his   morality   and   the   manner   on   which   he travels on life's journey in harmony with those about him. TO   CONCLUDE   Freemasonry   is   vibrant   and   exciting,   simple   yet complex,   there   is   much   to   learn,   but   paramount   is   enjoying   our fellowship   and   endeavouring   to   reach   the   high   ideals   to   which   we aspire.
A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LIVERSAGE LODGE Will go here
2 3
to the Liversage Lodge - 5027
In the Province of Derbyshire
The Grange, 457 Burton Road, Littleover, Derby
Every man has his own reasons for joining Freemasonry,  hopefully you’ll find your reason in the Liversage Lodge.

FACTS

The Secretary Liversage Lodge The Grange 457 Burton Road Littleover DE23 6XX Tel: 01283 703282 or 07570 465493
ADDRESS
WELCOME

THE LODGE ROOM

Masonic     Lodges     are     named     by     their original   founding   members.   They   can   be named     after     the     town     they're     in,     a historical   figure,   a   famous   Mason,   or   even a   symbolic   word   or   phrase.   The   name   of the   lodge   is   always   followed   by   a   number, in   our   case   the   Liversage   Lodge   No.5027. The   number   is   issued   by   Grand   Lodge   of England     and     designates     the     order     in which    lodges    have    been    chartered.    The older the lodge, the smaller the number. Many   of   the   details   in   a   lodge   room   are patterned   after   aspects   of   King   Solomon's Temple,    as    described    in    the    Bible    and other      historical      records.      Freemasonry teaches   by   symbolism,   and   much   of   that symbolism   is   based   upon   the   accounts   of Solomon's   Temple.   The   Temple   was   built in   the   10th   century   B.C.   on   Mount   Moriah in   Jerusalem.   Solomon   built   it   as   a   temple to   God   and   to   store   the   sacred   Ark   of   the Covenant,   which   contained   the   tablets   of the   Ten   Commandments   given   by   God   to Moses.   The   details   of   Solomon's   Temple are   described   in   the   Bible   in   1   Kings   and   2 Chronicles.     In     its     time,     the     temple's magnificence     was     known     all     over     the ancient world. When          Freemasonry          became          a philosophical    organization    in    the    1700s, the        Masons        who        developed        the ceremonies   and   practices   of   the   fraternity adopted     the     symbolism     of     Solomon's Temple    to    help    teach    moral,    social    and spiritual ideals. Until   recently,   it   was   common   practice   for a   lodge   building   to   be   called   a   Masonic temple,      but      because      of      a      general misunderstanding         that         Freemasons actually   went   their   lodges   to   "worship",   it was   decided   to   remove   the   word   temple and   replace   it   with   Lodge   Room.   You   will still    find    the    word    Temple    being    used within     the     Lodge     but     this     is     out     of familiarity and habit. A   lodge   room   contains   much   that   is   based on   the   descriptions   of   Solomon's   Temple, however      there      are      many      variations throughout     the     world,     depending     on differences   in   customs,   rituals,   and   rules, but   in   general,   lodge   rooms   are   arranged in a very similar fashion. The     modern     Masonic     Lodge     Room     is rectangular      with      seating      around      the perimeter .    The    ceremonies    of    the    lodge take   place   in   the   centre   of   the   room,   so everybody has a good view. Lodge   Rooms   are   oriented   east   to   west.   Ancient    temples    were    constructed    this way   to   be   aligned   with   the   east-to-west path   of   the   sun.   Even   if   a   Masonic   building actually   faces   north   and   south,   when   you walk     into     the     lodge     room,     you     are symbolically facing the East. There    is    an    altar    or    pedestal    where    the Holy   Book   is   placed.   This   book   is   referred to   as   the   Volume   of   Sacred   Law.   In   some Lodges    the    altar    is    in    the    centre    of    the room   in   some   the   altar   is   directly   in   front of the Master's chair. Officers    have    chairs    located    at    specific positions   in   the   room.   The   Master   is   in   the east,   on   a   raised   platform   of   three   steps. The    Senior    Warden    is    in    the    west    on    a platform    of    two    steps,    and    the    Junior Warden   is   in   the   south   on   one   step.   The steps    symbolise    the    progression    of    life: youth, manhood, and age. There   are   two   tall   pillars   with   globes   on the     top,     patterned     after     two     bronze columns           that           were           prominent architectural       features       of       Solomon's Temple.    The    pillars    can    sometimes    be found   on   either   side   of   the   Senior   Warden, or   sometimes   next   to   a   doorway   leading into the lodge. The   Liversage   Lodge   meets   on   the   third Wednesday   of   the   month   throughout   the year,    where    communications    are    read, proposed   members   are   voted   on,   and   the members   catch   up   on   each   other's   lives. Often,    guest    speakers    are    invited,    or    a member    will    give    a    presentation    on    the ritual,    history,    philosophy,    or    symbols    of Masonry.   Other   special   meetings   are   held to   initiate   new   members   and   perform   the various    ceremonies    to    advance    them    to full    membership.    These    ceremonies    are called degrees. Because   the   primary   goal   of   Freemasonry is    fellowship,    a    meal    is    served    after    the meeting,   in   the   lodge   dining   room   in   the old    English    Festive    Board    tradition    of    a banquet   where   traditional   Masonic   songs are    sung    and    ceremonial    toasting    takes place.

FREEMASONRY

Freemasonry   is   one   of   the   world's   oldest secular   fraternal   societies,   having   been   in existence   since   the   17th   century.   There   are lodges   of   freemasons   in   every   part   of   the world.    It    has    its    origins    and    symbolically bases    itself    on    the    old    craft    guilds    of stonemasons   who   built   our   cathedrals   and many     other     wonderful     buildings.     Our members    are    drawn    from    every    walk    of life   and   from   every   race,   colour   and   creed, and   all   are   welcome.   The   fraternity   is   non- denominational       non       political,       these subjects   being   specifically   excluded   from our       discussions.       However,       essential qualifications   for   membership   are   a   belief in   a   Supreme   Being,   God,   or   however   you wish   to   describe   the   Deity.   Have   a   desire to      attain      and      maintain      the      highest standards    of    morality    and    be    charitably inclined. WHAT     WE     ACHIEVE:     The     three     grand principles      on      which      Freemasonry      is founded    are    Brotherly    Love,    Relief,    and Truth   and   every   freemason   endeavours   to achieve   these   high   ideals.   These   principals are   the   basis   for   all   our   ceremonies   and quoting     from     a     Masonic     article     "that enshrined    in    our    constitutions    and    has been       since       1723,       freemasons       were enjoined     to     be     men     of     honour     and honesty,    by    whatever    Denominations    or persuasions    they    may    be    distinguished, whereby   freemasonry   becomes   the   centre of    Union    and    the    means    of    conciliating true   friendship   among   persons   that   must have      ever      remained      at      a      perpetual distance."   To   experience   the   atmosphere of   a   Masonic   lodge   where   the   members truly    sit    as    brothers,    in    friendship    and harmony     is     quite     unique     in     to-day's society. Our   ceremonies,   which   are   carried   out   in ancient   form,   with   stonemason's   customs and   tools   being   used   as   allegorical   guides, demonstrate     and     emphasise     the     high ideals   of   our   society.   These   ceremonies   are best   described   by   quoting   from   a   Masonic article   which   states   that   "   by   enacting   a series    of    memorised    playlets    we    teach others    and    ourselves    tolerance    and    an understanding        of        humankind,        the importance   of   charity   and   we   learn   about ourselves   with   a   view   to   becoming   better and more tolerant human beings". Charity     (Relief)     plays     a     major     role     in Masonic   thinking.   The   charitable   support given   by   Freemasons,   both   with   personal involvement   and   money   is   well   known.   At national   level   many   Charities   and   appeals are    helped    by    the    Grand    Charities,    to which   we   all   contribute.   At   Provincial   and local    levels    individual    lodges    give    their support   to   the   good   works   being   done   in their    particular    areas.    To    freemasons    to relieve   the   needs   of   those   less   fortunate than    ourselves    is    always    in    our    minds. Truth   can   cover   many   facets   of   life,   but   to a   freemason   it   is   mainly   the   knowledge   of himself,   his   integrity,   his   morality   and   the manner     on     which     he     travels     on     life's journey in harmony with those about him. TO   CONCLUDE   Freemasonry   is   vibrant   and exciting,     simple     yet     complex,     there     is much   to   learn,   but   paramount   is   enjoying our   fellowship   and   endeavouring   to   reach the high ideals to which we aspire.

WELCOME

We hope that you find these pages informative and illuminating; they are designed to give you an insight into our lodge in particular and of course Freemasonry in general.   We sincerely hope you enjoy your visit to our web pages and for those of you who are masons we look forward to seeing you at one of our meetings, but if you are new to Masonry and considering joining then you need look no further, you will be assured of a warm and friendly welcome in the Liversage Lodge. We meet at 6.15pm on the 3rd Monday in the month throughout the year at the The Grange, 457 Burton Road, Littleover, Derby for our regular Lodge, but on the 2nd Tuesday of each month, except June, July and August, we have our Lodge of Instruction which is a much less formal gathering. This is where we practice ritual, rehearse for future events and where the Master and Officers for the following year get a real feel for the job. There are 250,000 Freemasons belonging to 8,000 Lodges throughout England and Wales.  Worldwide, the figure rises to six million, all with their own special reasons why they enjoy Freemasonry. For  some, it’s about making new friends  and acquaintances. For others, it’s  being able to help deserving causes - making a contribution to family and society. But for most, it is simply an enjoyable hobby. A chance to meet old friends in a happy and sociable environment. Every man has his own reason for joining Freemasonry and hopefully you’ll find your reason in the Liversage Lodge. If you think Freemasonry might be for you then contact us here. Click here to email THE LODGE SECRETARY The Secretary Liversage Lodge The Grange 457 Burton Road Littleover DE23 6XX Tel: 01283 703282 or 07570 465493
A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE LIVERSAGE LODGE Will go here
1
3
2

ABOUT

FACTS

The Grange, 457 Burton Road, Littleover, Derby
to the Liversage Lodge - 5027
in the Province of Derby
Every man has his own reasons for joining Freemasonry, hopefully you’ll find your reason in the Liversage Lodge.
WELCOME